Jonathan

Postby Jonathan » Tue Sep 14, 2004 4:08 pm

I've been reading so much about RSS I finally decided to investigate. I'd like to jump in by trying out your free version, but have reservations.

Although I know your FAQs clearly indicate that the software does not contain spyware, I also notice (in the comparison of the Personal and Advanced editions) that the Personal edition does not provide "Secure RSS Feeds." What does this mean? I am so troubled by the spyware/adware that my computer is infected with, I'm rather skittish. Why isn't it "secure?"

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Postby support » Tue Sep 14, 2004 4:19 pm

Jonathan wrote:I've been reading so much about RSS I finally decided to investigate.

Welcome aboard! You're in for a fun time :-)

Jonathan wrote:Although I know your FAQs clearly indicate that the software does not contain spyware,

This is absolutely true. We hate the damn stuff as much as you and everyone else does.

Jonathan wrote:I also notice (in the comparison of the Personal and Advanced editions) that the Personal edition does not provide "Secure RSS Feeds." What does this mean? I am so troubled by the spyware/adware that my computer is infected with, I'm rather skittish. Why isn't it "secure?"


The technical answer is that a secure feed is one that has an address that starts with "https://".

The non-propeller-head answer is that secure feeds are feeds that have been heavily encrypted so that they can't be intercepted and/or tampered with as they fly around the Internet. If you ever do any online banking or use Amazon or anything like that, you may have noticed that the URL's start with "https://" and a little gold padlock shows up somewhere in your browser, indicating that you are in a secure area.

It's the same thing with RSS feeds. Some people or companies may want to publish feeds that contain private or sensitive information that only certain people will be able to read. These feeds will be published as secure feeds and the Advanced Edition of Awasu will let you subscribe to them (assuming you have permission, of course).

So it's really just an additional feature that Awasu offers - the ability to read secure feeds is not something that casual users are likely to need, it's more for people using it for business purposes - and has nothing to do with spyware or viruses.


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