Awasu » Third-world wireless
Friday 16th July 2004 1:16 PM [General]

I've never really been the prototypical geek in that I'm rarely interested in tech for its own sake. Instead, I've always been much more fascinated with what it can be used for. I blogged earlier about wireless technology in Laos and Cambodia and talked about how the new technology was helping people in some of the poorest parts of the world connect and communicate with each other and the rest of the world.

A new article came my way the other day talking about wireless in Nepal and interestingly, they're using Windows instead of Linux. They they talk about the problems with localisation and in an environment where the majority of people can't read even their own language, let alone English, such things are critical.

Still, forget about surfing the net down at Starbucks, this is life-changing stuff. Feel free to donate. We have.

4 Responses to this post

Thanks for linking to my interview with Mahabir Pun.

I also spoke to the Jhai Foundation in late 2002. It surprised me that the projects were almost completely different: off-the-shelf computers vs. home made boxes; Windows vs. Linux; and localized vs. non-localized.

Thanks for dropping by. I guess so much is determined by the expertise of the available people.

An intriguing project 🙂

For a 3rd World Wireless solution check these guys out:

http://www.firstmilesolutions.com

USD $500 to wire up each village - good grief! It's almost trivial 🙂

Thanks for the link.

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Friday 16th July 2004 12:41 PM [General]

I've never really been the prototypical geek in that I'm rarely interested in tech for its own sake. Instead, I've always been much more fascinated with what it can be used for. I blogged earlier about wireless technology in Laos and Cambodia and talked about how the new technology was helping people in some of the poorest parts of the world connect and communicate with each other and the rest of the world.

A new article came my way the other day talking about wireless in Nepal and interestingly, they're using Windows instead of Linux. They they talk about the problems with localisation and in an environment where the majority of people can't read even their own language, let alone English, such things are critical.

Still, forget about surfing the net down at Starbucks, this is life-changing stuff. Feel free to donate. We have.

Have your say